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Saturday mail delivery to stop this summer

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Buffalo: Saturday mail delivery to stop this summer
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The United States Postal service plans to stop delivering mail on Saturdays this summer. It's part of an effort to trim down its $20 billion deficit. YNN's Katie Cummings talked with customers about how the change will affect them.

CHEEKTOWAGA, N.Y. — After years of discussion and studies, the Postal Service has decided to move ahead with a modified delivery schedule.

The agency says it has noticed a decline in business and first class mail, and starting in August, it will halt Saturday mail delivery.

"We will continue to deliver packages on Saturday and our post offices will still be opened, so for customers who need to drop mail off or maybe pick up something they couldn’t get during the week, that still will be an option," said Karen Mazurkiewicz, USPS spokesperson.

Some postal customers say they are indifferent to the change.

"I think one day missing it is not going to make a big deal in the long run," said Mary Jagiello, Lancaster.

"Right now, everything is online, you do a lot of things electronically, direct deposits, pay bills, so it really doesn’t affect me," said Shawn Loman, Buffalo.

"Most of my junk mail comes on Saturdays and most of my bills come during the week and I can wait another day to get a bill," said Tania Becker, Cheektowaga.

However, others think it will have a negative impact.

“I think it will be detrimental to a lot of people, businesses," said Christopher Hulett, Buffalo. "Saturday delivery is something that we've all grown accustomed to."

"My husband has a home office, so he also receives deliveries sometimes from work, so it's important to me to continue that service," said Michelle Zanelotti, Williamsville.

The Postal Service says it can save $2 billion through the measure and attributes some of its debt to pension mandates.

Meanwhile in a statement, Congressman Brian Higgins says:

“Comprehensive postal reform would relieve the obligation to prefund pension obligations and would dramatically change the balance sheet of the Postal Service. Last year, I was among more than 220 bipartisan cosponsors on a bill that would recalculate the pension funding requirement. This bill has the votes to pass and should have been brought to the Floor but the Speaker has refused to do that.
Mazurkiewicz says the Postal Service continues to look at ways to close the $20 billion gap, including administrative cuts and consolidated mail processing.

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