Friday, August 01, 2014

Follow us:
Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Subscribe to this news feed 

News

Buffalo

Pa. truck driver killed on I-86

  • Text size: + -
Buffalo: Pa. truck driver killed on I-86
Play now

Time Warner Cable video customers:
Sign in with your TWC ID to access our video clips.

  To view our videos, you need to
enable JavaScript. Learn how.
install Adobe Flash 9 or above. Install now.

Then come back here and refresh the page.

A Pennsylvania man was killed early Thursday morning on a slick Interstate 86 in Chautauqua County. As YNN's Mark Goshgarian tells us, the truck driver was going too fast, lost control, and hit a patch of black ice.

MINA, N.Y. — "The entire road was nothing but a sheet of ice," said Randy Hamilton, Findley Lake First Assistant Chief.

Hamilton was one of the first on scene of a truck accident around three Thursday morning. It happened on I-86 East in the town of Mina.

"There was debris laying all over the roadway, there was fiberglass from the hood, and from the fenders of the truck, parts of the fender was laying on the side, there was parts of the engine laying on the road," said Hamilton.

Deputies say 63-year-old Milton Pertl of Girard, Pennsylvania, was killed in the crash. He was driving a box truck, hauling mail for the U.S. Postal Service.

Authorities say he was going too fast for the icy road conditions when he slammed into the back of a tractor trailer.

The driver of that truck was stopped in traffic when he was hit, and suffered only minor injuries.

Pertl died at the scene.

"It took quite a while to get the gentleman out of the vehicle because of the nature of the crash and it was devastating that he was inside the wreckage and they weren't able to get him out very quickly at all," said Charles Holder, Chautauqua County Undersheriff.

I-86 was shut down for hours, then open to one lane, while crews cleaned up.

Because of slippery road conditions this time of year, deputies are warning drivers to slow down, plan ahead, and be prepared.

"You could be going on a pavement which is completely fine, dry with good traction and then the next few feet you're on black ice and you wont even know it until you try to turn or brake and you have no control whatsoever," said Holder.

"You can't see it, it blends right in with the road, so you won't know you hit any until its too late," said Hamilton.

No charges have been filed.

10.11.12.248 ClientIP: 54.237.77.181, 23.62.6.199 UserAgent: CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/) Profile: TWCSAMLSP